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Barwick-in-Elmet

Church of England Primary School

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Barwick-in-Elmet

Church of England Primary School

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Spelling Stars

Bring words that follow this week's spelling rule to class for an awesome point! 

Introducing the Spelling Shed App!

If you wish, you can download The Spelling Shed App from the App store, and use the QR codes to upload this week's spelling lists; so you can practise them at home on an ipad.

http://www.spellingshed.com/

Introducing...Spelling Stars! Children complete one star activity of their choice per day, focusing on the weekly spelling words.

w/c 26.3.18

Words to practise over the Easter holidays consist of statutory words - it is expected that all children in Y6 will know the full list.

 

foreign

apparent

appreciate

persuade

individual

language

sufficient

determined

explanation

pronunciation

w/c 12.3.18

This week, we are looking at word families; this week's words all feature -acc

 

 

Picture 1

w/c 5.3.18

This week's rule focused on the soft 'c', formed by -ce.

cemetery

certificate

sacrifice

celebrate

nuisance

necessary

December (don't forget the capital)

deceased

hindrance

prejudice

 

 

w/c 26.2.18

This week's words sound like the last set, only these have a -tial ending.

partial

confidential

essential

substantial

torrential

sequential

potential

spatial

martial

influential

 

 

w/c 5.2.18

This week's rule is words ending in -cial

  • official
  • special
  • artificial
  • social
  • racial
  • crucial
  • facial
  • beneficial
  • superficial
  • antisocial

 

The sound /shuhl/ can be made in two ways

-tial and -cial

This week we are looking at words ending in -cial

 

 

Picture 1

26.1.18

This week's words are from the statutory word list: trickier words, that we often forget how to spell.

 

attached

available

average

competition

conscience

controversy

correspond

embarrass

especially

exaggerate

19.1.18 - inter

This week's words feature the prefix: inter

 

Inter -  a prefix occurring in loanwords from Latin, where it meant “between,”“among,” “in the midst of,” “mutually,” “reciprocally,” “together,”“during” ( intercept; interest); on this model, used in the formation of compound words ( intercom; interdepartmental).

 

interrupt

interfere

intercept

interject

intertwine

interim

internal

intersperse

interloper

interest

12.1.18

This week's words explore word families, and how many words often derive from the same root:

commit

committee

transmit

submit

commitment

emit

permit

intermittent

omit

unremitting

 

The English root mit comes from a Latin word that means ‘to send.’ Mit also shows up as miss in many words, so be on the lookout! Some common words from this root include emitmission, and dismiss

 

 

5.1.18

This week's spellings focus on words that contain either -ie or -ei. 

Words with the long /e/ sound spelt ‘ie’ or ‘ei’ after c (and exceptions).

 

siege

receive

believe

caffeine

mischievous

convenience

achieve

receipt

deceive

seize

11.12.17

This week we are focusing on personal spellings - words we often get wrong in our writing, but really should know. 

Common problems include prefixes and suffixes, particularly dis- (as in disable, disappoint, dismount etc), and -ful (as in beautiful, grateful, joyful etc)

 

4.12.17

This week we are looking at unstressed letters in polysyllabic words:

definite

desperate

literate 

secretary

interesting

dictionary

Wednesday

vegetable

different

privilege

Quite often, (and especially with a Leeds accent!), we don't say the letters, meaning we forget to include them in our writing.

 

27.11.17

This week we are looking at hyphenated prefixes...

co-operate

co-ordinate

co-own

co-author

re-enter

re-educate

re-cover

recover

re-elect

re-energise

 

Some words with prefixes need to have a hyphen added to separate the prefix and the root word. For example co-ordinate, re-educate, co-author. All of these words have a prefix that ends in a vowel and a root word that begins in a vowel.

 

Some words have a hyphenated prefix as without one, the meaning changes. 

e.g.

re-cover: to put a new cover on. "Please arrange to re-cover the armchair.'

recover: to obtain what one has lost possession of. "The police managed to recover the stolen goods."

 

20.11.17

Spelling rule for this week is:

Words that end in /shus/ sound -tious, -cious, -xious

 

ambitious

vicious

superstitious

precious

anxious

nutritious

delicious

suspicious

obnoxious

cautious

Test on Monday 27th as we are a bit behind due to the trips/visits last week....

13.11.17

Spelling rule for this week:

Adding suffixes with vowel letters to words ending in -fer

(e.g. -ing, -al, -ence, -ee)

 

referring

referred

referral

reference

referee

preferring

preferred

preference

transferring

transference

 

Knowing when to add an extra R:

You add another R if you can clearly hear the -fer. You would add it to, for example, referring as you can clearly hear the -fer. Even though you can just hear the -fer in referee, you don't add another R as it is more of an -f because it isn't stressed.

 

(e.g. refer -> referring) no

                   (extra R)

(e.g. refer -> refering) enlightened

 

                                                                          frown Have fun!

 

(e.g. refer -> referee) no       

               (no extra R)

(e.g. refer -> referree) enlightened

Thank you to our e-cadet Jacob for completing this week's rules!

-fer

-fer 1

-ible

-ible 1

6.11.17 -ible words

Words this week are:

possible

horrible

terrible

visible

incredible

sensible

forcible

legible

responsible

reversible

We have investigated how, in most of the words, we can not hear the full root word, which gives us the clue that the word is an -ible, and not an -able, word. However, there are always exceptions, and these simply need to be learnt. These are highlighted in red. (Note how we drop the 'e' at the end of the root word, prior to adding the -ible ending).

 

30.10.17 -able words

Words this week are:

reasonable

perishable

dependable

fashionable

knowledgeable

likeable

believable

noticeable

excitable

adorable

We have explored how we can usually hear the full root word before the ending. Words that end in 'e' usually lose the 'e' before adding the -able, but not always! We need to think about our phonics - do we need to keep the 'e' in order for the word to sound the same? If so, like the 'dge' in knowledge, we keep the e!

 

16.10.17 - -ent/-ence/-ency

Words this week are:

 

innocent

innocence

decent

decency

excellent

excellence

confident

confidence

existent

existence

 

Many adjectives in the English language end in the same sound made with either –ant or –ent. For our last set of spellings, we practised spelling –ant adjectives that became –ance or –ancy, e.g. For this set of spellings, we are now practising spelling –ent adjectives that become –ence or –ency nouns.

Are we confident that we know all the meanings of these words?

 

9.10.17 - ant/-ance/-ancy

Words this week:

observant

observance

expectant

expectancy

hesitant

hesitancy

tolerant

tolerance

relevant

relevance

 

Many adjectives in the English language end in the same sound made with either –ant or –ent. 

It is often tricky to decide which ending to use when you are spelling them…

A good rule to follow is if the root word can be given an –ation ending then it will usually end in –ant.

observation

observant

So if the root word can be given an –ation ending, then it will usually end in –ant (and not –ent).

Here are some more example words that follow the same rule:

toleration / tolerant

heistation / hesitant

 

2.10.17 - -ce/-se nouns/verbs Homophones

This week, we are going to look at some of the most commonly misused words in the English language.

Doctor's Practise - what is wrong here?

The sign should read ‘Doctor’s Practice’.

Practice is a noun and practise is a verb.

Because he wanted to be an Olympian in the future, Joe tried hard to practise his diving from the top board.

In the English language, the -ce word is a noun, and the -se word is a verb. Americans use -ce as a verb, so be careful with US spellcheck!

 

advice

advise

device

devise

licence

license

practice

practise

prophecy

prophesy

 

2.10.17 Ambitious Adjectives

What is a synonym?

A synonym is a word that has the same (or nearly the same) meaning as another word in the same language. Choosing ambitious synonyms can make your writing more precise and interesting.

We thought of some synonyms for the adjective ‘fantastic’, and came up with...

astonishing, astounding, fabulous, unbelievable, incredible, amazing, wonderful and many more. Then we played around with how we can up-level sentences by using more ambitious vocabulary. 

Words for this week are:

aggressive

hostile

awkward

obstinate

desperate

frantic

disastrous

calamitous

marvellous

spectacular

I hope to see these words in your writing!

 

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Barwick-in-Elmet

Church of England Primary School

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  • England Primary School,
  • Chapel Lane,
  • Barwick-in-Elmet, Leeds,
  • West Yorkshire, LS15 4HL
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